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A project by Architeam
Work begins on OMA’s unusual design for Taipei Performing Arts Center in Taiwan
26/02/2012
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Work begins on OMA's unusual design for Taipei Performing Arts Center in Taiwan
Image © OMA

Rem Koolhaas’ extraordinary Taipei Performing Arts Center (TPAC) has now begun onsite following a groundbreaking ceremony on 16th February, 2012, attended by President Ma Ying-jeou, Mayor Hau Lung-pin, and representatives from OMA and local design partner Artech Architects.

Work begins on OMA's unusual design for Taipei Performing Arts Center in Taiwan_1
Image © OMA

The unusual form looks to challenge public preconceptions of generic theatre spaces, with a central cube clad in corrugated glass off which various performance volumes project. Once completed in 2015, the centre will include a 1,500-capacity theatre and two 800-seat theatres which can be combined into one immense performance space with a 60m-long stage for experimental art.

Work begins on OMA's unusual design for Taipei Performing Arts Center in Taiwan_2
Image © OMA

Adam Frampton, Associate-in-charge, explains: “The premise of the design is to combine three theatres into more than the sum of their parts. Similarly, the collaboration between the Taipei City Government, international and local architects, engineers and specialists, has yielded a collective result exceeding individual potential.”

Elevated from ground level, the main cube enables an existing thoroughfare to continue up and under the building volume, enveloping users and members of the public into a cavernous atrium space.

Work begins on OMA's unusual design for Taipei Performing Arts Center in Taiwan_3
Image © OMA

Rehearsal and technical areas are shared between the three theatres and are made visible to the public as David Gianotten, Partner at OMA, details: “TPAC engages a wide public not only by providing spaces for performances, but also through exposing parts of the backstage to the public. The general public will have a glimpse of performing arts production and a new theatrical experience.”

Source: www.worldarchitecturenews.com